Our Jobs, Ourselves

The average person changes jobs about a dozen times throughout their career, which opens up a decent amount of wiggle room for rethinking one’s hopes and dreams. This week, get inspired by an array of fascinating stories about those who’ve made a big career leap and how you can contemplate your own.

I used to write for Sports Illustrated. Now I deliver packages for Amazon.
Austin Murphy, The Atlantic 
There’s a certain novelty, after decades at a legacy media company, in playing for the team that’s winning big.

Millennials are already itching to switch careers
Elizabeth G Dunn, Bloomberg
With many young professionals looking for a change, learning how to pivot is more important than ever. 

Terry Crews on being dead broke, his career turning point, and the mindset shift that fuels his success
Jenna Goudreau, CNBC
From playing in the NFL to sweeping floors for $8 an hour to Hollywood stardom. 

How to make the right connections when you don’t already have an “in”
Dorie Clark, Harvard Business Review 
A strong network is an invaluable career asset. Here are a few things to remember when getting started.

‘Emerging’ as a writer — after 40            
Jenny Bhatt, Longreads                               
Recalling the rites of passage that led to a shift in identity from corporate executive to woman writer of color.

How to find your dream job
Abe Streep, Outside
An eight-step plan for rebooting your career and finding a job that you love.

Could an ex-convict become an attorney? I intended to find out
Reginald Dwayne Betts, New York Times
After serving time for a crime I committed at 16, I discovered how hard it is for a felon to get a second chance.

5 great second career moves
Miriam Cross, and Lisa Gerstner, Kiplinger 
Five people who have made their second acts work for them, and tips on how you can make it happen for you, too.

How Eva Chen went from pre-med student to director of fashion partnerships at Instagram
Tyler McCall, Fashionista
She’s adding one more title to her already-lengthy resume: children’s book author.

Three steps to reinventing your career—even if you’re not sure what you want to do next
Khe Hy, Quartz
Learn to help others with no expectation of anything in return.

 


 

Pocket for work and play 
Ever come across articles on your work computer about changing careers that you’d rather read at home? Get Pocket’s browser extensions for Firefox, Chrome, etc. and save those stories for later.